Difference: RingSling (26 vs. 27)

Revision 272018-10-17 - AlyssaLeonard

Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="WebHome"

Line: 23 to 23
 
  1. Learn to use it
    Make sure to "expand" each section and read the full details the first time you read through.

1) Pick a safe fabric

Changed:
<
<
Pick a bottomweight fabric that passes the Four Rules of Fabric Selection.
>
>
Pick a bottomweight fabric that passes the Four Rules of Fabric Selection. It should be made of natural fibers and feel sturdy, like pants or a tote bag, not thin like bedsheets or a handkerchief.
 
<--/twistyPlugin twikiMakeVisibleInline-->
Line: 36 to 36
 
  1. CARE INSTRUCTIONS - machine washable If your ring sling is going to be used in the water, you'll want to follow the guidelines for picking a safe athletic mesh fabric.

    A popular choice for ring slings is using a cotton tablecloth. A 60" wide tablecloth that is at least 84" long (ideally closer to 100"+) can be cut in half lengthwise and will only need one raw side hemmed before sewing the rings in for the shoulder. Another good option in the USA is to go to Walmart and look for Waverly brand duck cloth in the upholstery fabrics. It will look a little canvassy, and the bolt tag will have a green circle with the weight "185 gsm" on it. If you are already a member of our Facebook group, check out this poll in the group to see real members' actual opinions and experiences on their favorite materials for a ring sling, or search the group for the hashtag "#fabric" for a number of posts and videos to offer guidance. You can also check this page for people's general opinions about different fabrics' qualities.


    <--/twistyPlugin-->

2) Buy the right amount of fabric

Changed:
<
<
In general, 3 yards is plenty for almost every size wearer. Remember; you can always chop the tail shorter, but you can't make a too-short sling longer. You need to account for 10%-20% shrinkage and 5"-16" for the shoulder. 3 yards will allow for a 5" shoulder depth and 20% shrinkage and still make an XL sling.
>
>
In general, 3 yards is plenty for almost every size wearer. Remember; you can always chop the tail shorter, but you can't make a too-short sling longer. You need to account for 10%-20% shrinkage and 5"-16" for the shoulder. 3 yards will allow for a 5" shoulder depth and 20% shrinkage and still make an XL sling, so that's a good place to start if you aren't sure.
  ring_sling_size_chart.jpg
Line: 72 to 72
  Most (not all) fabrics for a ring sling will work well in a single layer with 3" large sling rings. Expand below to see a more detailed chart.
Changed:
<
<
Always buy unwelded rings DESIGNED for babywearing that have been tested for weight and safe materials.
>
>
Always buy unwelded rings DESIGNED for babywearing that have been tested for weight and safe materials. NEVER use rings from a craft store, and we do not recommend any rings from a hardware store.
 
<--/twistyPlugin twikiMakeVisibleInline-->
Line: 166 to 166
 
<--/twistyPlugin-->

7) Cut to width

Added:
>
>
Cut the fabric width down to between 28-34” (for a finished hemmed width of 26”-32”.)
 
<--/twistyPlugin twikiMakeVisibleInline-->
Changed:
<
<
Cut the fabric width down to between 28-34” (for a finished hemmed width of 26”-32”.) If you bought a 57"-60” wide tablecloth or 57"-60" wide bolt fabric, you will simply need to cut it in half lengthwise to be (approximately, after shrinkage) 28” wide. If you bought 45" wide bolt fabric, do NOT attempt to skimp by cutting the fabric in half; this will be much too narrow. Likewise, do not be tempted to try and make an extra-wide 45" sling to avoid cutting; this much fabric will likely not be adjustable through the rings. Some fabrics, including osnaburg and duck, will “snip and rip” straight. Simply snip about 1" of the fabric at the right width and then rip it down the length. If you aren’t sure, test near an edge. Otherwise, you can measure and iron a straight line and then cut along the crease. Jacquard tablecloths typically do NOT snip and rip easily.
>
>
If you bought a 57"-60” wide tablecloth or 57"-60" wide bolt fabric, you will simply need to cut it in half lengthwise to be (approximately, after shrinkage) 28” wide. If you bought 45" wide bolt fabric, do NOT attempt to skimp by cutting the fabric in half; this will be much too narrow. Likewise, do not be tempted to try and make an extra-wide 45" sling to avoid cutting; this much fabric will likely not be adjustable through the rings. Some fabrics, including osnaburg and duck, will “snip and rip” straight. Simply snip about 1" of the fabric at the right width and then rip it down the length. If you aren’t sure, test near an edge. Otherwise, you can measure and iron a straight line and then cut along the crease. Jacquard tablecloths typically do NOT snip and rip easily.
  As for cutting off extra length, I would personally suggest waiting until your sling has the shoulder sewn in so you can test it, then cut the tail to your desired length and hem the bottom at the end. You can always cut the tail shorter if it is too long, but you can't make it longer if you cut it too short.
Line: 181 to 183
 
<--/twistyPlugin-->

8) Hem your edges

Changed:
<
<
Hem the two long edges of your fabric. If you are confident in your length, you can go ahead and hem the end of the tail as well.
>
>
Hem the two long edges of your fabric. If you are confident in your length, you can go ahead and hem the end of the tail as well. Otherwise, you can wait until the very end to hem the end.

You can hem the shoulder end, or serge this end (if you have an overlocker) or run a line of zigzag stitches to keep it from unraveling.

  RingSlingHems.jpg
<--/twistyPlugin twikiMakeVisibleInline-->
Line: 199 to 203
  Depending on the type of extra details (like pockets, or accent fabrics) you want to add to your sling, this may be a good time to sew them onto the fabric, as opposed to trying to add them after the fact.
Changed:
<
<
>
>
<iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3uBzwTkUwhY" width="560"></iframe>
 
<--/twistyPlugin-->

9) Pick & Sew Your Shoulder

Changed:
<
<
Choose a shoulder style (a dice roll is a good method). After folding, ironing and pinning any desired pleats, fold the fabric through the rings and secure it in place with 3 parallel lines of stitching. Use 100% polyester thread and a heavy duty needle for this step.
>
>
Choose a shoulder style. After folding, ironing and pinning any desired pleats, fold the fabric through the rings and secure it in place with 3 parallel lines of stitching. Use 100% polyester all-purpose thread and a heavy duty needle for this step. If desired, one of your three lines can utilize a "decorative" stitch if your machine does them.

Expland below to read about the different shoulder styles. If you are still overwhelmed and can't decide, a hybrid (Eesti) style is a good place to start.
 
<--/twistyPlugin twikiMakeVisibleInline-->
Line: 264 to 268
 
Changed:
<
<
>
>
<iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Qty_s3Y3sGU" width="560"></iframe>
 
Changed:
<
<
<--/twistyPlugin-->
>
>

</>
<--/twistyPlugin-->
 

10) Pockets and Accents (Optional)

pockets.jpg

Changed:
<
<
Pockets and accent pieces are a great option if your desired fabric pattern is only available in a thin, unsafe fabric like quilter's cotton. Sew decorative patterned accents onto a coordinating solid colored, wrap-safe fabric.
>
>
Pockets and accent pieces are a great option if your desired fabric pattern is only available in a thin, unsafe fabric like quilter's cotton. Sew decorative patterned accents onto a coordinating thicker, wrap-safe fabric.
 
<--/twistyPlugin twikiMakeVisibleInline-->
 
This site is powered by the TWiki collaboration platform Powered by PerlCopyright © 2008-2019 by the contributing authors. All material on this collaboration platform is the property of the contributing authors.
Ideas, requests, problems regarding TWiki? Send feedback